© Peter Massingham 2017
Massingham Family History
Trace your roots

About

Origins

This ancient name can be traced back to the villages of Great and Little Massingham in  North Norfolk, near the town of King's Lynn. It is well recorded in the surrounding  villages of Field Dalling, Langham, and in the county town of Norwich itself, suggesting  that the nameholders, or at least many of them, do derive from the original 13th century land owning family. The early recordings include Adam de Messingham in Lincoln in the Hundred Rolls of  that county for the year 1273, and John de Messingham in the London Rolls for the  same year. Thomas de Messyngham is recorded in the Poll Tax Rolls for the city of York  in 1379, whilst amongst the early church recordings is that of William Massingham who  married Ursula Wade at Fincham, Norfolk, on June 13th 1595.

History

The name is tribal and  probably Anglo-Saxon,  and translates as the  'hamm' (place or  village) of the Maessa  (Mass) tribe (ing).  These people are also  recorded in Lincoln, as  'Massingberd', the  castle (berg) of the  Maessa tribe.

Spelling

The first recorded  spelling of the family  name is shown to be that  of Walter de  Massingham, which was  dated 1272, in the  Hundred Rolls of the  county of Cambridge,  during the reign of King  Edward 1, known as 'The  Hammer of the Scots',  1272-1307. Surnames  became necessary when  governments introduced  personal taxation. In  England this was known  as the Poll tax.
Other examples of the recordings showing the surname development are those of William  Messengham, christened at Sharrington, Norfolk, on July 1st 1691, and Mary Massingham  who married Thomas Wilson at Norwich Cathedral, on October 14th 1701, in the reign of  William of Orange (1689 - 1702).

Development

© Peter Massingham 2017
Massingham Genealogy
Trace your roots

About

Origins

This ancient name can be traced back to the villages of Great and Little Massingham in  North Norfolk, near the town of King's Lynn. It is well recorded in the surrounding  villages of Field Dalling, Langham, and in the county town of Norwich itself, suggesting  that the nameholders, or at least many of them, do derive from the original 13th century land owning family. The early recordings include Adam de Messingham in Lincoln in the Hundred Rolls of  that county for the year 1273, and John de Messingham in the London Rolls for the  same year. Thomas de Messyngham is recorded in the Poll Tax Rolls for the city of York  in 1379, whilst amongst the early church recordings is that of William Massingham who  married Ursula Wade at Fincham, Norfolk, on June 13th 1595.

History

The name is tribal and  probably Anglo- Saxon,  and translates as the  'hamm' (place or  village) of the Maessa  (Mass) tribe (ing).  These people are also  recorded in Lincoln, as  'Massingberd', the  castle (berg) of the  Maessa tribe.

Spelling

The first recorded  spelling of the family  name is shown to be that  of Walter de  Massingham, which was  dated 1272, in the  Hundred Rolls of the  county of Cambridge,  during the reign of King  Edward 1, known as 'The  Hammer of the Scots',  1272-1307. Surnames  became necessary when  governments introduced  personal taxation. In  England this was known  as the Poll tax.
Other examples of the recordings showing the surname development are those of William  Messengham, christened at Sharrington, Norfolk, on July 1st 1691, and Mary Massingham  who married Thomas Wilson at Norwich Cathedral, on October 14th 1701, in the reign of  William of Orange (1689 - 1702).

Development